Kaleidoscope - Dr. Kimberly Gordon Biddle
Common Core Math Standards for Early Elementary Students
Posted July 9th 2014

Common Core Math Standards have been developed by Math experts, Math teachers, and Governors of various states. The majority of the State Departments of Education in the United States have adopted these standards and they are currently being implemented. These standards impact early childhood education directly because of the common core math standards that exist for kindergarten through third grade. The standards are a guide as to what children should know by the end of each grade. For instance, some of the standards for kindergarten are comparing numbers and analyzing shapes. Two of the skills for first graders are telling and writing time. In second grade children should master skills such as the basics of multiplication and comprehension of place value. At the end of third grade teachers should help their students understand fractions and solve four-step word problems.

These standards emphasize academic rigor and cognitive coherence. Given that these standards are to be learned in early elementary, the common core standards indirectly influence what is taught in preschool and infant/toddler years. Some early childhood educators agree with the common core math standards and some do not. Indeed, not all states have adopted the common core standards. As stated previously, the Governors of various states were instrumental in the development of the standards and most states have already adopted and implemented the standards.

So, where do you stand? Are the standards appropriate for young children? Are the standards too hard for children to learn at the given age or are the standards too easy? The author of this blog believes that the standards are fine, but what is most important is the curriculum and pedagogy used to meet the standards. What are your thoughts and beliefs about the common core math standards for early elementary students?

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Reply from veronica posted on November 10th 2015
I believe that Common Core Math Standards are fine for some children as well as for some teachers. However not everyone learns the same way and not all teachers teach the same way. My son is in second grade and he is doing common core math, I must say he is doing really well. He loves doing the counting exercise. He struggles a bit with word problems but overall he likes it. His second grade experience has been a great experience, but his first grade not so much. When he was in first grade he struggled to understand the concepts. I knew he could do it, but teacher did not. His first grade teacher was always complaining about the standards and saying that it was impossible for the kids to learn the concepts. When in reality, she was the one struggling to teach them. When my son went to second grade I thought it was going to be the same struggles to do math. Surprisingly it was not. His second grade teacher does not complain at all and my son is doing great.
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Reply from veronica posted on November 10th 2015
I don’t really follow basketball, but I enjoy watching when I have time. Michael Jordan was an immersive basketball player he must know what he is talking about. His quote \"Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence win championships\" tells me that he knows how much work it takes to be winner. Talent plays a significant role in success. Some people are very talented and success comes easy to them. I am definitely not one of those people. I know I am smart but I know I have to work double and spend double time doing homework and studying for test than other people. I have always said I know I am not the smartest, but I am will work the hardest. This motto has helped me get through school
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Reply from Ceceilia posted on May 20th 2015
I used to think that the whole idea of common core was just a little bit ridiculous. I was definitely not a fan because I sure did things differently when I was a kid. I think that I am kind of in the middle now. I used to think that it was too hard, but I realized and learned in class that it is not too hard because these children do have the capacity to accomplish these standards. Along with having the capacity, there are teachers and parents to help guide them to be successful with these math standards. It does become difficult because each child does learn at different paces, therefore it is better to make sure every child understands and go at the right pace.
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Reply from H Bonino posted on August 15th 2014
I think that the standards are fine, and in my understanding are more appropriate that California's prior math standards. I do not feel that having standards is a bad thing, but only when used to measure a child's progress in development. Every child is different and there are ranges of understanding and mastery. It is important to remember that the development of the child is the most important thing. Standards should not a to do list to complete.
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Reply from Jessica DeGroot posted on August 11th 2014
I think that the standards which are appropriate for children haven't changed its the expectations of adults that has changed. It is more difficult for preschool and infant/toddler teachers to have to be more knowledgeable and make sure that they are preparing the children for what common core is expecting from them. I think each child is different so therefore the standards should be able to vary based on the children who are learning. I think that common core is expecting children to come in to elementary education already knowledgeable in math, and sometimes that is not the case.
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Reply from Kimberly Burt posted on August 11th 2014
I think that it is important to have standards that are universal. I think that it is a good foundation for teachers and a guide so that they are teaching the children appropriately. I also think that it can also be a tricky set of “rules” all children learn differently and may need different ways to learn so developmentally the teacher will have to recognize where the child is falling and adapt to that. So with that I think that the standard should be more of a guideline then a strict “need to be” level of education at an age group. I think personally out of every area of education math is very critical and that teachers need to make sure that students understand. Whether that is following the common core or adjusting to make it developmentally appropriate for each individual child.
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Reply from Linda Flake posted on August 11th 2014
It is good idea to have common core math standards for young children because not only do they provide what a child should understand by the end of the year, they provide exposure and a foundation for later mathematical learning. The standards are not too hard and are age appropriate. However, each child learns differently so it is up to the teacher to provide the developmentally appropriate experiences and practice students need to achieve mastery which requires time. As long as teachers can evaluate their student’s needs and provide some support for struggling students, the standards can help teachers prepare students for learning mathematical concepts in later grades.
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Reply from Cheryl posted on August 11th 2014
I believe that all children grow and develop differently. I think that the standards end up putting more pressure on teachers and children that they may not be ready for. I don't think the standards should be completely taken away because they do give teachers and parents a base for about where their children should be at. However, I do think the approach to the standards need to be changed. Some children will struggle with them, not because their "behind" but because they may be developing in another area "ahead". Each child is different so teachers should be able to use the standards as a guideline and still approach teaching in a individual developmental approach.
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Reply from Sherrie posted on August 10th 2014
7. I believe these standards should remain as purely guidelines for teachers to use. I don't think teachers should be forced to use standards they do not agree with. I believe it will discourage both students and teachers. The teachers may move to quickly from standard to standard to make sure that they are getting through them. As well as students may feel overwhelmed with all they need to learn.
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Reply from Graciela posted on August 10th 2014
I believe that Common Core Standards are only a set of standards but not curriculum; usually, states will still control their curriculum.
Indeed, state will decide the teaching based on the Common Core the same as curriculum. According with readings, The Common Core standards are internationally the way to be informed by the standards of other countries. 

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Reply from vila rezai posted on August 10th 2014
I don’t agree with the Common Core Standards for young children. Common Core Standards may guide teacher what to teach but it is too many standards that can overwhelm children. Teachers push themselves to teach standards and children are pushed to learn faster in which the other developmental domain is not taught or checked as much as should be. I believe young children should have more free play in which they naturally exploring, experiencing, and enjoying children literature, physically, cognitively, and emotionally and socially development. Common Core Standards does not allow teachers enough time to work on children’s emotion and social behavior.
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Reply from amanda dragon posted on August 9th 2014
I think that the common core standards are good for two reasons. First, they are guideline for states to follow so that if a child moves states they are not behind their peers. Also it gives teachers a guideline as far as what to teach in their curriculum for the school year. Teachers can be creative in their methods of implementing the learning in their classroom so that is is align with the common core standards yet give young children the opportunity for hands on learning activities. This needs to follow the children upward in to the higher grades where testing is emphasized and rote drill becomes more about teaching to the test.
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Reply from Katie posted on August 6th 2014
I don’t agree with common core standards for young children. Children are not robots and not every child should be expected to be at the same level in preschool or Kindergarten. I believe we should advocate for a fun, playful, student centered preschool or Kindergarten. Research tell us that children at this age need a much more play based environment so that they can naturally learn problem solving, impulse control, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, social interaction skills etc. These are some of the skills that will be important in their future. Most children love Kindergarten and parents are always thrilled when they see their child learning \"academic skills\", but I think they are impressed with the wrong things. We are seeing more burn out and anxiety in our middle and high school students who have been subjected to this type of academic Kindergarten program. I think students are missing key components of their childhood with standards like these being pushed on them so early in life.
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Reply from Carolyn posted on August 6th 2014
I agree that we need to have math standards for kindergarten students, it helps to know exactly what students need to learn. Teachers need to implement a variety of strategies to make sure every child learns: hands on, small groups, computer games,cuisenare rods, smartboards, etc. Instructional assistants can help lead small group activities. Parent participation in the class can help also (have a parent lead a small group in a kindergarten math lesson). Also, the teacher could send home handouts about what the Common Core standards are and demonstrate ways parents can teach math at home.
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Reply from Felicia Zierke posted on August 5th 2014
I do not agree with the common core standards for young children. I do think that common core can be considered a good guideline for teachers to follow so they can teach their children. However this may not be appropriate for all young children. All children learn differently depending on their ability to learn. Children may not learn the concept fast enough to keep up with the rest of the class, then they fall behind. Common core standards are focused more on the scores then the process of learning. Topics get drilled in children heads and they don't get to fully grasp and understand the topic. Children learn through play and hands on learning, many children learn differently there is no one way that will be appropriate for all children. Children need to practice and have trial and error period to learn how to self correct themselves. On one end of the argument, I do feel like children across states should all have the same standards, and guidelines to learn by. This is part of the common core. I just don't feel like all children learn the same way and things shouldn't be tested in the drill and kill way. But all states should have cross country standards .
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Reply from Tracy posted on August 5th 2014
My belief of the common core math standards for early elementary students is the implementation of these standards may be difficult to some students. All elementary students have different levels in which they learn so could the common core math standards be adjusted to meet the learning level of the individual child having a difficult time in learning a certain content area. By looking at the guidelines of the math common core standards every elementary student have to meet the expectations of the common core standards of each grade level of what they should be able to know. I think the common core standards are not too hard for children to learn because children learn through practice, repetition, and exploration. The implementation of the math common core standards will challenge the advanced learners and provide the students with a more complex and dynamic academic curriculum in the classroom.
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Reply from Alyssa Miller posted on August 5th 2014
I am not a fan of strictly using the common core standards; they are a good guideline for teachers to know what to teach but all children learn at a different pace and may need more time to learn one topic over another. The common core standards are more focused on "drill and kill" and good test results, but children need time to have hands-on, real life experience with the different topics and have the ability to make mistakes which teachers do not have because they need to focus the standards the children will be tested on.
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Reply from Janelle posted on August 5th 2014
I do not agree with common core standards. I believe what they are trying to teach children now is making it too difficult to understand. Simple problems turn into a nightmare for them. Apart from them, teaching the common core standards is making it harder for parents at home to help teach their children.
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Reply from Griselda posted on August 5th 2014
I don't agree with common core due to it not letting children learn. This standard children will only memorize and will not actually learn by it. This is too stressful for children and teachers.
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Reply from angelica calderon posted on August 5th 2014
I do not agree with the Common Core Standards for young children. I believe that more support needs to be given to children with diverse learning abilities. Children need time to learn through exploration and hands on activities. Giving children the time to learn and not pushing them to learn the next standard when they have not mastered the first is important to keep in mind. I believe this pushes teachers to teach to the test rather then remembering what is developmentally important for the child.
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Reply from Elisa posted on August 5th 2014
I believe Common Core Math Standards are important. However, I think that it needs to start with a good foundation. Children are capable of learning these standards. I also believe that teachers need to implement a strong curriculum using the core math standards as well as implementing the children’s skills and individualized teaching.
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Reply from Veronica posted on August 5th 2014
I don't agree with the Common Core Standards for young children. I think there are too many standards, and children are being pushed too fast to learn all the material. Young children are curious and natural born problem solvers. I believe we should allow children to explore and learn while playing and through trial and error. I know many teachers/administrators who teach to a test and not provide opportunities for children to develop naturally.
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Reply from Natasha Hayes-Evans posted on August 5th 2014
I, believe in the Common Core Standards and the reasoning is I use to live in Georgia from ended of 2002 until 2006 and the standards in a preschool setting was different from California. The preschool I worked for used the World of the Fingertips Curriculum. At the time it was abstract for what I was use to. I recall, during my interview observing a two year old class and the children were asked questions and had to compare if an object related to main object picture or not. I was use to toddlers and two year classroom playing or doing art nothing so developed as comparing and contrast. Also the time year children were eligible to start Kindergarten was different. Yes, the standards seems a bit much,but the long-term expectation for children are greater now then ten years ago. My final thoughts the Common Core Standards are put into place by Governors to see children succeed. We as ECE professional educators have to apply the concepts base on each individual child needs.
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Reply from Ildiko Novak posted on August 5th 2014
I agree that having the same set of standards for all states (in this case not all states have agreed) to follow so that the curriculum follows the children. The problem still comes down to the quality of teaching. The time and dedication needed for a teacher to reach each and every child in the way they learn can be overwhelming. Is there a way a teacher can give so much all the time without letting their own family life suffer or burning out? As I take each class in the BA Child Development Program, I am aware of what I am not doing in my preschool class. Taking the lessons learned in the program and applying them in the class is a slow process because it is a matter of planning and organization and redesigning a curriculum that is already in place. Support from the small schools is needed for the teacher to have the time to put forth the effort to make a difference in the curriculum. Quality in (to support the teachers) can result in quality out to students. The standards can be met but the key is the quality of the teachers
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Reply from CHRISTINA BROWN posted on August 4th 2014
We all need a base in which we can properly assess, utilize, and build from. The common core math standards give us just that, but to ensure that the students are living up to these standards involves too many variables to even begin to look at the standards as absolute. It’s a tool that should guide the educators on their endeavor to carry out the curriculum with the hopes that the student is successful in grasping and mastering fundamental building blocks that turn out to be prerequisites for the next standard. I concur; the teachings and the curriculum play a major role in meeting the standards. I don’t think it’s something that the students cant master when give the right tools; however, I wish that alongside these Math experts, Math teachers, and Governors were everyday teachers, tutors, and classroom assistances that have direct contact with the students being held to these standards.
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Reply from Mary posted on August 4th 2014
I believe Common Core Standards are meant to be used as a guide – a guide to get the child where he/she needs to go with the help of a good teacher. By having standards, everyone is on the same playing field. A child can transfer schools, go to another state, and still be at the same level as his peers. States can accurately compare their scores with other states – maybe generate better performance. Standards are good – something to aspire to. However, should a preschooler be learning the beginnings of algebra and geometry and more? What happens to the preschool child who is not developmentally ready to learn this concept? I worry about the child who is held back or the one who is pushed forward only to fail because he/she doesn’t “get it.” Instead of pushing back the first grade curriculum into kindergarten, and kindergarten into preschool, gradually introduce a curriculum with rigor into the primary grades. The math standards are more specific and demanding. Preschoolers and kindergartners have a need for play and they should be on the playground to do what they do best.
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Reply from Rebecca Chi posted on August 4th 2014
I feel as though these standards are a bit much for children. Common core may be a good thing to implement, however requiring kindergarteners to analyze shapes is hard. Yes, it's possible but it's a lot of new things for children to learn. We focus a lot on the academic side of school and we don't focus enough on the social side of learning.
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Reply from Danielle Bylow posted on August 4th 2014
When it comes to the common core math standards, I do believe they are appropriate for young children. I will admit, I have not followed the common core state standards very closely but after reading about the math standards for young children, I do believe they are reachable goals. The only thing is as a person who works with preschool, we are having to prepare children for when they go to kindergarten and are introduced to common core. My classroom has received new science and math kits, to help children be the most prepared for the transition. Though I do think it is a lot more work involved, it does help children think more in depth. I do however think that hands on learning is the best way and if that could be incorporated in with the common core math standards, children will be more successful.
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Reply from suki posted on August 4th 2014
Math is hard to learn for many children. I believe that these standards are where they suppose to be. These standards are not too hard or too easy to master for young children, if enough time is given children can master them by the end of their school year. The only problem is that there are way too many standards to cover for each grade each year that teachers have to move fast from one content to the next and children do not have enough time to practice some of the mathematical problems they are learning. So sometimes children get left behind because they did not have enough time to learn the skills they were suppose, and sometimes this leads to loosing the interest in math for some children as well.
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Reply from Erica Ambriz posted on August 4th 2014
I believe the common core stadards are a guide and serve as goals for teachers and educational professionals to help children reach these standards but can we really expect all children to develop all the same skills by the same age.How we go about supporting and providing educational experience to help children meet these standards is important not to forget about the childrens individuality. We need to have children be our focus and not let the stress of meeting standards push us to push children so much that they stress about not meeting standards.
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Reply from Marlo Snyder posted on August 3rd 2014
I am in favor of common core standards. As a teacher, I welcome the training that has come with the implementation of common core. I feel that common core allows teachers the freedom to use thematic teaching and project based learning which is beneficial to every type of learner. As a parent I agree with raising the standards for our children's education. This policy is exactly what the California school systems needed in order to focus more on education politically. Until now California has been grossly behind other states in the amount of money that is being spent on education.
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Reply from Melonie Williams posted on August 3rd 2014
We have been systematically forcing more and more educational expectations on the youngest of learners to the point that preschoolers are no longer allowed to just be kids and those in kindergarten are expected to be little grown-ups. Children are now expected to be students who make the grade. I feel the Common Core Standards are acceptable as a standard of learning but that they are forced on ages that are too young. It would be more appropriate to shift the Standards by a year or two – the expectations of a 5-year old should be shifted to age 6; expectations of the 6-year old shifts to age 7, etc. However, given the fact that children learn at different paces and children have different abilities, the Standards should only be considered a general guideline with adjustments made to accommodate children who are at either end of the learning spectrum – those needing additional help and those ready for additional challenges.
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Reply from Amber posted on August 2nd 2014
I think that the common cores are helpful, they put students and teachers on a step to step plan to ultimately be ready for high school graduation in order to go into the world prepared for the mathematical concepts of society. They are helpful in order to make sure each student is on the right step in order to move on. I like to have concrete ideas of where the students should be.
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Reply from Valerie Fine posted on August 2nd 2014
I think the common core is a guideline of standards for K-12 students need to know. Preschool teachers and educators rely on their state preschool learning foundations to help young children become school ready. Yet is has been stressful because there are requirements the teacher has to teach and children have to learn. Many parents complain of too many tests and not enough creative arts or music in school anymore. I think children who don't attend quality preschool are more likely to struggle in kindergarten.
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Reply from Lorena Poon posted on August 1st 2014
I think that it’s important to have the concept of the common core standards it’s a good foundation. Every child is different and they learn at different levels so we have to make sure we accommodate their learning needs. Children are fast learners and the sooner we start the more they will grasp.
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Reply from Tammy posted on August 1st 2014
I think it is good to have standards to give each child the opportunity to an equal and fair education. I feel that it needs to start at home with the families. Parents need to stand behind their child’s education and if parents don’t care their children will loose out. Parents need support from schools as well. Many parents don’t know how to help their children with homework or they might even think that the school is responsible for their child’s education alone. Afterschool programs try to close the learning gap, but parents are still left out of the loop on what they need to do to support their child’s learning. I feel that the trickle down effect of the standards only make the teachers and students more accountable for their teaching/learning, which is not a bad thing. But it also puts a lot of stress on the teachers and schools to meet these standards, which is a bad thing. Teachers already spend a lot of their own time working on school related things, student teacher ratio’s are not always at optimum learning size and pay is so-so.
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Reply from kristy posted on July 31st 2014
I have no problem with the common core math standards for early elementary children. I feel they are age appropriate, and children are capable of learning the standards. What I have a problem with is the method in which these standards are taught and practiced. Many teachers feel restricted to what they can or can't teach, because they are pressured to teach to the test. They have to teach a specific way because thats how the work is suppose to be shown on the standards. However, not all children learn using the same methods. One child may be able to show their work in the "correct" way, while another shows their work in a different way, even if they come to the same answer. Children shouldn't be penalized for their differences.
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Reply from Nancy Rosario posted on July 31st 2014
I think the Core Math Standards are appropriate for young children but are too hard to learn for some children. Each child is unique and different what might be easy for some might be very hard for others. Keep in mind that there are children with special needs and that they need extra support to meet the standards. I think teachers play an important role in having the children meet these standards. Therefore, teachers need to be provided with the proper training to help the children succeed.
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Reply from Carmen Mejia posted on July 31st 2014
I don't agree with the Common Core Math Standards that the state has created. In order to implement these standards, the state needs to provide the support needed for the students that are struggling or are slow learners. Teachers need to be given the proper training to facilitate the children's learning.
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Reply from Albert Decima posted on July 31st 2014
I believe that the concept of common core standards are appropriate for the typical child. However I do not believe they support children who are already behind developmentally. I currently work in a school district were teachers feels it does not provide the support and tools needed to be successful.
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Reply from maria Duran posted on July 31st 2014
I consider the math standards for young children are appropriate because children are like sponge they could learn everything at the young age.I agree with the author of this blog about that standards are fine because the main purpose of this is to meet the standards using the curriculum.
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Reply from jennyra posted on July 31st 2014
I think that there are benefits to the common core standards as a teacher to know what material to teach. However I also think it can put a lot of pressure on both the teacher and child that he/she has to know these things in a certain amount of time and we have to keep in mind that every child learns at their own pace and they have different ways of learning.
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Reply from cynthia martinez posted on July 31st 2014
I do believe that the math standards are appropriates for the children, children are very intelligent and they can learn fast. I do believe that what the children are taught is appropriate for their age. every child learns differently so the method needs to meet the child needs.
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Reply from Edith posted on July 31st 2014
The Common Core is an educational plan that wants to help out children futures by preparing them for their future jobs. I do not think that this is a good idea because it is cutting their development of imagination. I think children should be able to have little bit more freedom within the classroom.
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Reply from Ana R posted on July 31st 2014
Of course standards are great and beneficial to the children. I believe the teachers and educators need to be supported to inform themselves of how to meet these expectations. Children will learn at different paces but it is impirtant for the teacher to be able to manage the various learning styles and give each child opportunities to master these standards.
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Reply from LAURA VAZQUEZ posted on July 31st 2014
I believe the standards good for students and teachers as teachers it help us determine our learning objectives in each lesson plan. Teachers have the responsibility to provide to students what they need to meet what is required by these standards. I don’t think that the common core math standards are in the median point according to each grade level.
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Reply from Francesca Lopez posted on July 31st 2014
I believe the standards seem a bit excelled but can be beneficial to early elementary students because it gives them more of a challenge. I believe the children can learn the standards as long as there is a well-trained teacher present in the classroom.
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Reply from Alicia Marquez posted on July 31st 2014
I don't believe the standards are appropriate for young children. When children are transitioned to elementary school they lose out on the hands-on learning that is developmentally appropriate and instead are forced into learning test-taking strategies. It would be great if our children were better prepared for the new common core standards. But I think that the pressure due to state testing is to blame. Our children have been aware of common core standards, but have had little time to focus on them because of the CST tests and unit tests they are required to take which involve all subjects. Ideally, I would love to see those tests go away or reflect what life is really like. For example, looking things up to further engage and motivate their creativity and curiosity as well as working collaboratively with other students. In addition, some children struggle with speech and writing so the Common Core’s new focus on questioning , reasoning and explaining answers, could particularly be more challenging for students with learning disabilities. This is somehing that needs to be given more thought especially to accomodate children who are already struggling.
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Reply from viridiana guardado posted on July 31st 2014
I believe that the common core math standards are good. Students can learn this standards if they are taught well by teachers. These standards will allow every student to be on the same page.
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Reply from Rosita Villarreal posted on July 31st 2014
I am in favor of structure and the standards provide this for both the teachers and the students. But, we must remember that children need to be assessed before moving forward. Teachers need to know what knowledge the child has brought to the classroom before appropriate curriculum can be assigned.Also, children need to be introduced to higher levels of learning, it basically in the end,it all comes down to the individual child and teacher responsiveness.
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Reply from Alicia Marquez posted on July 31st 2014
I don\'t believe the standards are appropriate for young children. When children are transitioned to elementary school they lose out on the hands-on learning that is developmentally appropriate and instead are forced into learning test-taking strategies. It would be great if our children were better prepared for the new common core standards. But I think that the pressure due to state testing is to blame. Our children have been aware of common core standards, but have had little time to focus on them because of the CST tests and unit tests they are required to take which involve all subjects. Ideally, I would love to see those tests go away or reflect what life is really like. For example, looking things up to further engage and motivate their creativity and curiosity as well as working collaboratively with other students. In addition, some children struggle with speech and writing so the Common Core’s new focus on questioning , reasoning and explaining answers, could particularly be more challenging for students with learning disabilities. This is somehing that needs to be given more thought especially to accomodate children who are already struggling. Reply__ I agree with you. Child assessment would be beneficial when making a decision to move forward.
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Reply from luz vazquez posted on July 31st 2014
I consider that implementing Common Core Math Standards is positive for children and teachers because it is a well organized guide of what children should have learned by the time expected. The level of hardness of the standards for children to learn could vary according to their individual cognitive development. This guide easily let teacher to know if some children are falling behind to provide them additional assistance or tutorial. Standards are appropriate for young children because as much teacher exposes them to mathematic inquiry, discovery, and reasoning, children will love go forward more complex problem solving. Teacher’ lesson plan should provide children multisensory experiences, age appropriate stimulation for thinking and fun time for a good introduction to mathematic science.
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Reply from maria r posted on July 30th 2014
I believe the standards are a good thing. It's great that children are being taught the cardinal meaning behind concepts. But I also believe that teachers need the proper training. Most teachers are very fustrated because changes are taking place and no one is teaching them. I think those transitional children are at a disadvantage. How could they learn something well when teachers don't know it that well themselves.
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Reply from Larry posted on July 30th 2014
I believe that the common core math standards are neither too hard or too easy. I feel that as long as the teachers provide the necessary tools and support the child will be able to grasp these standards.
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Reply from Rodolfo posted on July 30th 2014
I believed standards are good and will contribute to cognitive development of children. However, what I learned from past experience of teaching children, was not all children can comprehend the rigorous requirements of State mandated standards. Due to traditional system of advancing a child to next grade level although he/she is not academically ready, we just have to rely to the next teacher and hopefully he/she can make the State mandated standards workable for the benefit of certain or particular child.
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Reply from petra posted on July 30th 2014
I believe the standards are beneficial for the students. The most important component that facilitates the learning is how the material is being presented. The method being used to apply these standards needs to be well elaborated and implemented to help students achieve their goals. The assessment techniques need to be modified. I feel that math is the subject teachers can get the most creative with.
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Reply from heather posted on July 30th 2014
I believe that these standards are not too hard for children because children need to keep up with what is being taught and having expectations makes it so the teachers can ensure that these children don't fall behind and then suffer. School is a place where you are being taught so having standards is making sure children are learning what they are there too learn. Also, keeps children on track. The teacher should get a good understanding about each child and where they are academically. So if a certain child needs help the teacher can still make sure they are learning the standards, but she is able to teach the child in a different way to where they will understand it.
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Reply from Sherrl posted on July 30th 2014
I feel standards are good, if they are well thought out. I feel most children can learn with the right teacher. If the teacher knows how each child in his class learns, then standards should be a good foundation
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Reply from Heather Mathews posted on July 30th 2014
I feel that the standards are good to have but the way in which they are monitored and the way the children are assessed should be changed. Due to the testing, teachers feel pressure to make sure the children learn what they need to learn, and this doesn't allow for teachers to change up different teaching methods. Teachers should be able to assess each child through observation and more one-on-one assessment, instead of through tests.
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Reply from Glinda Copridge posted on July 30th 2014
In view of the nature of math, it is important to consider the learning styles that children manifest during their nearly development. Therefore common core math can be as effective as any other math initiative only if it is taught to accommodate the learning styles of the children. Furthermore, training teachers to use not just oral styles of teaching but but visual and tactile forms which some aspects of common core addresses such as using manipulatives for math operations.
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Reply from mary duncan posted on July 10th 2014
Core math standards: Math was one of my enjoyable subjects. As far as concrete vs abstract give me the first. If applied in the right direction, it can channel your problems to a great outcome in life. It is a tool one uses on a daily basis. Yes, problem solving is very useful. In addition, the core standard will place the students on the same playing level as others. Great challenge for teachers to get their classes at the stage they should be.
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Reply from Chris Biddle posted on July 9th 2014
Establishing a standard, especially in subjects like math, that every accredited educational institution should meet, I believe is necessary. It ensures that all children are being exposed to a level of education that will adequately prepare them for a competitive world, regardless of what school they attend. Not only do I feel common core math standards should be implemented, we should make sure those standards meet those of the best performing countries in math, such as Germany, Japan, and the Netherlands. Once the standard is set, it us up to teachers and parents to figure out how to get students to reach that standard. One way to do so would be to find creative ways of making math interesting to kids. Get them introduced as early as possible to graphs, for example. Graphs are the key that visually tie the language of numbers to the real world. I believe the sooner a child sees how a mathematical formula renders a graph representing some entertaining geometric shape on a computer, the sooner that child's curiousity in math will grow.
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