Developmental Perspectives - Dr. Ana Garcia Nevarez
Vignette
Posted March 3rd 2013

Susana, a college senior, is preparing to graduate this semester. After exploring other career options in her junior year, she decided to major in child development—a major that would give her the option of working with children and their parents. Susana’s mom is a preschool teacher, and now that Susana is about to graduate, she feels a calling to become an early childhood teacher too. Susana recognizes that she enjoys and has a significant amount of experience working with young children, both as a babysitter and through helping in preschool classrooms. Susana spent time in her mom’s classroom in order to fulfill a fieldwork class that required her to volunteer in a preschool setting. Helping her mom in the classroom and watching how her mom interacted with the children was inspiring and motivating for Susana. Based on her experience, her skills, and her enthusiasm to work with children, she decides that she wants to be an early childhood teacher.

You probably have multiple reasons for wanting to become an early childhood teacher. Maybe you enjoy working and teaching young children, or you developed an interest in the field of early childhood education.

To know if you want to be a teacher, you must understand the many characteristics and qualities that teachers should possess. These qualities include certain personality characteristics, the ability of being self-aware and being intrinsically motivated in teaching. In order to be considered a good early childhood teacher, you must be able to reflect on your own behavior, motivation, and personality. Understanding these characteristics will allow you to make ethical and responsible decisions that may impact children, parents, or the community.

A good early childhood professional will also develop a teaching philosophy that will allow you to function well in the classroom. Your philosophy of teaching can be defined as your approach to and beliefs about teaching—reflects your values, knowledge, education, and experience. The following things come together to compose your philosophy of teaching: what you know and believe about yourself, schools, children, colleagues, and so on; what you have studied and learned; and what you have experienced in school, on the job, and in your personal life. Clearly, your philosophy of teaching will change and develop over time as you gain knowledge and experience and grow as a person and as a professional.

When you go for a job interview, school administrators will ask you to explain your teaching practices and your philosophy of teaching. This will be a challenge if you haven’t thought about the question beforehand. You also need to understand that this isn’t an offhand question—your teaching philosophy will guide your daily teaching practices in the classroom, and administrators are well aware of that fact. For example, if your philosophy of teaching is that children’s development of knowledge and understanding occurs through experimentation, active exploration, and questioning, then this philosophy will guide your teaching practices and assist you with the organization and activities of the classroom environment. Take a moment and think about your teaching philosophy.

As you think about and develop your philosophy of teaching, keep in mind the special importance of understanding children’s different needs, interests, and learning styles, both in general and individually. Please share your philosophy of teaching.

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Reply from Andrea posted on May 25th 2013
My philosophy runs closely with the teaching philosophy at my current work site. I work at the NAEYC accredited ASI Children's Center at CSUS, and I have their philosophy glued into my brain as I have been working there for over 3 years now. Our philosophy is that we are to treat each child, family, and staff member with respect. Children should be given choices whenever possible, and it is our job to build their confidence and pride in themselves and their work. Children learn through play, and this is assisted by us as teachers asking open-ended questions. These are some main points in our philosophy at the Children's Center, and I agree with them all and take them with me when it's time for me to work anywhere else as a care-teacher.
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Reply from Jose Lopez posted on May 20th 2013
My teaching philosophy will be very driven by my personality and learning experiences. I plan to provide activities that are very interactive and hands on while incorporating real world implications. This is how I learn and this is how I wish my education was based on when I was a child growing up. What I will find challenging, is actually incorporating traditional american curriculum into my philosophy. I just don’t see myself as a front of the classroom type teacher. I’m extremely hands on and proactive with everything that I do and I think that this may prove to be very beneficial in a preschool setting. My personality makes me extremely open to new perspective and educational opportunities which will hopefully give me an opportunity to incorporate new more successful strategies into my teaching philosophy. I have an almost detrimental ability of being self aware of my actions, so much so, that I’m often second guessing myself and following directions to the T, until I’m completely confident in my abilities. Because of this I’m extremely self aware about how I am behaving and intrinsically motivated to master my abilities to the point of optimal performance and comfort.
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Reply from Rebekah Mamola posted on May 20th 2013
My philosophy is teaching the whole child. I believe that children need to be nurtured in all domains and not just academically. I believe that children learn through experimentation and exploration in their environment. I also believe that a teacher’s role is to support and guide the child’s learning process. In addition, I believe it is the teacher’s responsibility to provide unique curriculum for each individual child that is developed based on observation and interests of the child. Furthermore, I believe that teaching requires extreme patience and flexibility.
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Reply from Janessa posted on May 19th 2013
When I decided to go back to school it was because I knew that I wanted to work with children, I was unsure is I wanted to teach but at the time I had a very young Godson that I was very cloase to and I found it so amazing how his brain worked and developed. So it was then that I decided that I wanted to teach children aged 3-8 so anywhere from preshool to second grade. As far as my philosophy goes I have always felt that as long as you know and understand that children are different and learn differently you will be a good teacher, but if you want to be a great teacher I think you need to know that play is essential in a child's development as well as questioning and exploration.
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Reply from Fermina Camacho posted on May 19th 2013
My philosophy of teaching is simple: be the teacher you've always wanted. I remember always feeling uncertain about things as a child constantly wondering and looking for answers for the silliest of questions. My teachers were strict and were adamant about academic progress rather than curing curious minds or discovering, imagining, or creating something spectacular. School seemed like work to me and it was a job a seldom enjoyed. I will definitely be a teacher that highlights academic improvement, but will also allow children to reach their full creative potential. I will be firm, but fun, open and helpful. I will be sure that all of my students and parents understand my expectations as I too will accept their expectations of me. I will also consistently teach life skills slipping in a few lessons here and there throughout the day. These children will be adults someday and I would be proud to bestow any type of wisdom that would contribute to their success as productive members of society in the future. I believe my dedication to my students success (in and out of the classroom) will be my ultimate goal as an educator.
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Reply from Karina Cervantes posted on May 17th 2013
As of now I am not sure whether or not I would like to be a teacher or not. However, I am aware that I would like to work with children and in a way you by default become an educator. It is important to have some sort of teaching philosophy and mine although simple reflects my experiences, values, and my education. My educational philosophy would be, “Keep an open mind. Teach with passion, with patience, and overall teach with love.” In my CHDV 132 course we needed to come up with a teaching philosophy and this was the most memorable quote that I remember from last semester.
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Reply from Rosario Sandoval posted on May 17th 2013
My philosophy of teaching is that children need to enjoy what they are doing. I believe that children's development of knowledge occurs through active exploration, questioning, experimentation and guidance. Also, I think teacher need to aware that children learn differently and as a result we need to have one than more way to do a certain activity.
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Reply from Rafaela Cortes posted on May 16th 2013
I am not interested of becoming a teacher but i do wan to work with children. I have nieces and nephews and i have seen them grow and learn a lot from them. I really like to work with children and i believe that they play a very important part of our life.They are the future generations and we have to guide them trough the right path. I am very passionate on teaching them new things and spending most of the time with my nephews and nieces. I love to see them playing and remembering of my class lectures every time i see each of their development stages. I do not have the teaching philosophy yet but i am working on that. I want to change a child's life and I always put everything that is in my hands to have them happy and to give them good advises.
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Reply from Lexe Valdivia posted on May 13th 2013
I think this blog will help many future teachers to decide whether or not they will like to be one. I personally think that the more experience a person has the better results will be. For an interview, the person will be able to answer questions about teaching due to his/her volunteer experience. For me, I found that thanks to volunteer experience did pay it off later since at the beginning I wants sure what I wanted to be, plus I wasn\\\'t getting pay so it is hard for anybody who volunteers, yet it did help me to get a job and I am looking forward to keep searching in the field I want to be.
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Reply from Lexe Valdivia posted on May 13th 2013
I think this blog will help many future teachers to decide whether or not they will like to be one. I personally think that the more experience a person has the better results will be. For an interview, the person will be able to answer questions about teaching due to his/her volunteer experience. For me, I found that thanks to volunteer experience did pay it off later since at the beginning I wants sure what I wanted to be, plus I wasn't getting pay so it is hard for anybody who volunteers, yet it did help me to get a job and I am looking forward to keep searching in the field I want to be.
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Reply from Kristina G posted on May 11th 2013
I love working with children. Its something I have been passionate for for a very long time. I think that learning should be fun and educational and I am definitely a firm believer that children learn through experimentation, active exploration, and questioning.
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Reply from Itza Gonzalez posted on May 9th 2013
First of all, I believe a teacher should be really passionate about his/her career. If your main interest isn't making a difference in children, then you should probably think again about what you really want to do. I can say I have loved kids ever since I was a kid and have been wanting to become a teacher since I can remember. I may have been influenced by my aunts being Kindergarten teachers and having the opportunity to take part in their classrooms. Given this, I strongly believe that learning should be made as fun as possible. I believe that play based learning at a young age is one of the best approaches. Play is a great part of a child's early years, thus we can learn a lot from this. I also believe that even though we have to meet certain standards, a teacher should be flexible and go at the pace of her students. Find ways to teach about things that the children like to make the education experience more enjoyable for both teacher and student. One of the most important things for a teacher to know is that each student is different and learns differently. More than anything flexibly,passion and being knowledgeable about what you teach are essential qualifications for an educator.
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Reply from selena v. posted on May 8th 2013
I do not have much experience being a teacher. I have been a teacher assistant in two Head Start settings, but for a short period of time. During the time I worked as an assistant it only was for a couple of hours each day because I would go to school full time. I do not have a philosophy of teaching. However, I believe I taught young kids by reflecting on my values, knowledge, and education. Some of the ways I taught children was by explaining the consequences of simple stuff they did not knew about. For example, why it was bad to be throwing the ball inside the classroom. Understanding that play is an important need for children’s development I would let children play the way they wanted to, but when they did stuff that would be a little dangerous then I would change their style of play. Moreover, my philosophy of teaching involves getting to know the children, which are under my care. I tried to know each child because there were different teaching styles I sometimes needed to use. There are times when some children require individual attention, others like to work with their peers and the teachers, and there are some children that do not like to be helped. My philosophy of teaching needs to be improved because I have yet to learn from other teachers their strategies that best work in teaching young children.
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Reply from Danielle Davison posted on May 6th 2013
I have such a passion for teaching and I think that passion will be taken into my philosophy. I believe that learning should be fun, but it should be educational as well. I think it is important to alter your curriculum and activities based on the children. They should come first. Their needs and their educational levels help you as a teacher. I also believe that it is important to have a philosophy where you provide appropriate materials to where the students can succeed but also strive to do better and accomplish more.
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Reply from Mona Dates posted on May 6th 2013
My philosophy is that learning should be fun as well as educational. The curriculum should be focused on what the children are interested in. I believe that if the child is interested in the topic they will learn a lot more. I believe that play is an important part of development and children learn a lot through play.
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Reply from kayla bruce posted on April 30th 2013
At the moment i am going to school to become a teacher. It has been something i have wanted to d osince i was about eight years old. I want to make a difference in kids life and the main way to do that is to teach them. Show them what they cn become. children’s development of knowledge and understanding occurs through experimentation, active exploration, and questioning. I agree with this because child learn best when they are either being active, when they are curiouse about something, or if they are having fun. As a teacher oneday i hpe i can show kids that learning is fun.
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Reply from Christian Solis posted on April 28th 2013
At one point in my life I do want to teach, though I am not sure what age, I believe that students must be motivated and feel comfortable in class. A teacher should be open to differences in opinions and have the capacity to agree to disagree. I also have seen school, like preschool programs with an overall philosophy and that all teachers should be on the same page. I think that it is difficult for everyone to have the same philosophy we are different and creating a personal mission statement seems to be more effective.
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Reply from Franchesca rivera posted on April 17th 2013
i am not interested in becoming a teacher but i am interested in working with children at some level. i have not yet created a teaching philosophy but i do believe it is crucial to provide children with a safe and nurturing environment. it is always important to encourage, support, and have motivation present in a child's environment. i believe their success has a lot to do with their self esteem and also believe that having a good sense of self is the foundation for a healthy and successful life.
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Reply from maychee khang posted on April 16th 2013
my teaching philosophy would be to teach the children in the most easiest way possible with other ways that can help them if they are struggling. there are always alternatives that can help children learn and understand steps to succeed. being patient is a key to success. teaching children is not easy and from my experience with children, practice is always important and is another key to success.
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Reply from Melissa A posted on March 31st 2013
Teaching is not an easy job. I am also a girl scout leader and I take much of my experience from there because I need to teach the girls many skills. My first time running a meeting what I thought was going to be easy was not. I had come up with my lesson plan and had everything that I wanted to do with the girls in an hour and half. It is different when you get in front of the girls. The first thing is everything you have plan does not goes the way you think it well. It is hard getting their attention, you need to know what there likes are and how they learn. Each child learns differently. Some are need to see it several times before they grab what you are trying to teach them. Each child is different. If you learn that everything you have plan well most likely not go as you plan it and you might need to move things. it is the most rewarding feeling when you see that they enjoy learning and doing the different activities. I love it and that is one of my many reasons why I want to be a teacher.
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Reply from Tanya Taranchuk posted on March 31st 2013
I haven\'t yet developed a fully defined teaching philosophy as i am not a teacher yet and still learning about the child development profession. However, from my past experience with dealing with children and teaching children at sunday school at my church, i have learned that it is very important to set up a safe and nurturing environment in the classroom for the children. Thus, as i become an elementary school teacher, i would like to promote a safe and nurturing environment in my classroom where children don\'t feel judged, discriminated, or left out. I want each child to feel safe and comfortable to share their opinions and feelings. I also would want each child to feel important and that whatever they have to say is as important as the person next to the child. I learned that in such environment children are more willing to open up about themselves and share their opinion. Also children are more motivated to participate in activities in a nurturing environment. I want children to see me as their friend that cares about them. In order to set up such a safe and nurturing environment, it is important to teach children about being respectful to each other and everyone around them. Furthermore, it is important to teach children about the class rules or guidelines set up in the classroom and that they need to respect those rules by obeying them. When it comes to a teaching style, i am a hands on person and a very visual learner. I believe learning is an interactive process which requires engagement and participation. I understand each child learns differently thus it is very important to use different techniques and tools when teaching. Some children are visual learners, some are auditory, and some are kinesthetic learners. It is a teacher\'s job to adapt and adjust her teaching style according to her students.
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Reply from Tanya Taranchuk posted on March 31st 2013
I haven't yet developed a fully defined teaching philosophy as i am not a teacher yet and still learning about the child development profession. However, from my past experience with dealing with children and teaching children at sunday school at my church, i have learned that it is very important to set up a safe and nurturing environment in the classroom for the children. Thus, as i become an elementary school teacher, i would like to promote a safe and nurturing environment in my classroom where children don't feel judged, discriminated, or left out. I want each child to feel safe and comfortable to share their opinions and feelings. I also would want each child to feel important and that whatever they have to say is as important as the person next to the child. I learned that in such environment children are more willing to open up about themselves and share their opinion. Also children are more motivated to participate in activities in a nurturing environment. I want children to see me as their friend that cares about them. In order to set up such a safe and nurturing environment, it is important to teach children about being respectful to each other and everyone around them. Furthermore, it is important to teach children about the class rules or guidelines set up in the classroom and that they need to respect those rules by obeying them. When it comes to a teaching style, i am a hands on person and a very visual learner. I believe learning is an interactive process which requires engagement and participation. I understand each child learns differently thus it is very important to use different techniques and tools when teaching. Some children are visual learners, some are auditory, and some are kinesthetic learners. It is a teacher's job to adapt and adjust her teaching style according to her students.
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Reply from Davi Ridley posted on March 31st 2013
I have so much respect for teachers. I believe they are the greatest people in the world. They devote so much of their time and energy into something that they know is important. I cannot wait to be one of them. To me, being a teacher means being understanding. A teacher needs to understand not only that every child thinks, learns, feels, and acts differently, but also how to manage and cater to each of them the best they can. Working alongside a sixth grade teacher for a while now has allowed me to see firsthand how this may go. The classroom I am in is home to so many different kinds of children, all of which learn in different ways. They value different things and show their emotions differently. Through everything, I have seen how the teacher really stresses several important things, like compassion, understanding, honesty, and respect. Teaching these concepts is something I have decided is not only important, but essential in teaching to children. In addition, it is important for the teacher to demonstrate these qualities themselves. Every child is different, and every class has a different dynamic, but it is very necessary for a teacher to be able to know their class and students well enough to teach their students these concepts despite the differences. This is what I want to do. This is what I intend to do with my future students.
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Reply from Reena Panchal posted on March 31st 2013
Growing up people would always come up to me and tell me that I would make a great teacher. And I didn't really believe it at first. I always wanted to do something in the medical field, and it wasn't until my nephew was born that I realized I wanted to be a teacher. There were so many things that I would be able to teach him and there were so many things that he was capable of learning. Being a teacher you really have to love what you are doing, because the children are depending on you to learn and get a good eduction. If you don't love what your doing, then chances are children won't either. When I see myself teaching others, I try to understand what the child knows first or anyone, doesn't have to be a child. I try to get a grasp of everything and then try to explain the added on details to them.I believe when trying to teach a new concept its always best to see what they know first because not everyone has the same background as others.
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Reply from Shelbi Andrion posted on March 31st 2013
I believe that the ability to teach future generations is an honor. I have never given any thought about a teaching philosophy, nor have I heard of it; I will keep that in mind as I continue my education. I want to be a positive example to my students by being a strong leader and helper. If I were to come up with a philosophy, it would implement learning through play and engaging experiments. I think that learning through play is important for the children. For me personally, I always learned better in environments where I was engaging in material without even realizing it. Experiments are always fun and they are a useful tool that can benefit the children.
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Reply from Monika posted on March 31st 2013
One does not become a “good teacher”, though I have an idea on what can be considered through my own educational experience. Yet there are no guidelines or rule books describing the basics in becoming a good teacher, it is from past experience. While studying as a child development major I\'ve found I don’t necessarily plan to become a teacher, but plan to educate in my own. I would love to help write and create ways of learning through entertainment; books, TV shows, movies and especially toys because that was how I was raised, through visual interactions. Though my way of learning is different than others, it doesn’t mean its wrong, they are several other ways in educating, but it also depends on the child as well. As a dyslexic I know what it means to learn differently, then most students in class. It takes longer to fully understand the prompt of an assignment, grammar and spelling. My philosophies of a good teacher is being colorful, visual, explore the imagination, asking questions to feed the mind of curiosity and help them learn something they haven’t before, but most importantly, for now, is to be understanding and think outside the box. Over all the philosophy of a good teacher all depends on the person and how they see their students achieving for the future and how there is always room for improvement.
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Reply from Elizabeth posted on March 26th 2013
A good teacher is not as easy as everyone may think it is. You really have to love what you do and always try to improve. A good teacher has to ask themselves how they can improve their teaching from one year to the next and continue doing that throughout the years. You must be able to acknowledge each and every child and meet all of their educational needs. You have to take the time to treat them equally and help each one individually meet their academic goals. Understanding these fundamentals will guide you toward a great teaching career.
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Reply from Angelica Palomares posted on March 26th 2013
When I become a teacher I would like to encourage my children to learn morals and be motivated in learning different subjects. I would like to encourage children to try their best on their homework or projects. I have worked in preschool classrooms and I observe how teachers motivate their children and create lesson plans each day. I would like to encourage parents to be active in their child's homework and school work. I like the idea that my teachers would create a system to motivate us to read and do our homework. My teacher would give us stars if we had done our homework right. If we reached a certain amount of stars we were able to receive a free homework pass. I liked this idea because I was able to receive an award for my achievement and hard work. I was able to have a private education which I think may be different than a public school education in which the teachers have a different set of rules and guidelines they have to follow. I hope to have a set of virtues in which each child is treated the same and if a child needs extra help I will be willing to offer as much help as needed.
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Reply from Raylene Larot posted on March 20th 2013
If I became a school teacher I visualize myself being very outgoing and trying to get my students ready for learning. I think when working with kids a high energy is needed to get them excited for new information. With that being said, there needs to be a fine balance between having fun with learning to the point where some things aren’t always going to be fun to learn, so don’t give children the assumption things will always be fun and games. I remember in 3rd grade we were learning math and my teacher made it so fun to remember how to subtract. He made everyone stand up and it was a good break from the typical lecture we normally got. Things like that are what I see myself doing. That’s good you mentioned understanding children’s different needs and interests because as an athlete, I would assume every kid would love sports. Thinking back on elementary school, there were some classmates that were into reading and Pokémon cards. So even though I prefer something, doesn’t mean everyone will so that will be the difficulty to adjusting to children’s interests. Obviously adjusting to the children’s needs goes deeper into the way I teach. I can’t assume every child likes to present information in front of the class and love group projects. Some kids may enjoy that but it can also be terrifying to others. If you make learning scary, children will grow up hating school and never be interested in learning because they were so traumatized when they were younger. I would try my best to find an even balance to make the majority of the class comfortable and have a lot of energy to get the children excited and interested.
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Reply from lenora posted on March 19th 2013
Teaching is not my profession of interest, although I have 6 years of experience working with after school programs and creating lesson plans. I've never thought about what my philosophy of teaching is and after reading this blog, I do understand how crucial this is in creating a lesson plan. I always strive to provide interactive learning activities that provide practice of CA standards in Math and ELA. My students tend to enjoy the activities I prepare, because there is always a fun component to them. I usually use games to develop multiplication skills, for example. My philosophy of teaching is that learning is an interactive process that requires a lot of participation and engagement and is perfected through practice. I have developed this philosophy of teaching as I have gained experience and practice in working with students. I will continue to use my philosophy as I work with students, because I have seen my students change their attitudes about school since I have worked with them. I believe a positive attitude towards school will help these students increase their educational understanding and development, and I love the fact that I have a part in this.
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Reply from Kenna R posted on March 19th 2013
It is very important to know one’s own motivations while working in educating young children. After volunteering at the children’s center in the morning, going to class, going to another full-time job, and then coming back home to study and sleep, it can be difficult to stay motivated for the same routine the next day. I believe as college students, in order to reach your full potential you should push yourself harder than expected to prepare yourself for any future opportunities. This doesn’t mean to stretch yourself too thin, but I believe that it is important to keep yourself a busy, active learner in the child development and education field to stay current on practices as well as to gauge your own capabilities. At this time I find it difficult some mornings to get up early and go volunteer at the children’s center, but as soon as I get there I am very grateful for the opportunity to work with these wonderful children and optimistic that I can make a positive impact on the development of each child I come into contact with. Some days I wish I could sleep in but that is what separates the selfless and motivated individuals from the average and bare minimum. These tireless people are the ones who should be working with our children, and that is who I aspire to become.
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Reply from Kenna R posted on March 19th 2013
It is very important to know one’s own motivations while working in educating young children. After volunteering at the children’s center in the morning, going to class, going to another full-time job, and then coming back home to study and sleep, it can be difficult to stay motivated for the same routine the next day. I believe as college students, in order to reach your full potential you should push yourself harder than expected to prepare yourself for any future opportunities. This doesn’t mean to stretch yourself too thin, but I believe that it is important to keep yourself a busy, active learner in the child development and education field to stay current on practices as well as to gauge your own capabilities. At this time I find it difficult some mornings to get up early and go volunteer at the children’s center, but as soon as I get there I am very grateful for the opportunity to work with these wonderful children and optimistic that I can make a positive impact on the development of each child I come into contact with. Some days I wish I could sleep in but that is what separates the selfless and motivated individuals from the average and bare minimum. These tireless people are the ones who should be working with our children, and that is who I aspire to become.
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Reply from Yrma Zevada posted on March 18th 2013
After working for an After School Program for the last 4 years, taken several ECE classes, observations, tutoring and taught lessons; I've learned that every child is different and every child requires of a different approach. My teaching philosophy would include getting to know each and every one of my students individually; which would include learning a little about their background, learning disabilities, and different learning technics. My goal is to provide my students with the most beneficial instruction technics, while still following our standards and lessons. I want to provide an open learning environment, where parent involvement is encouraged, as well the students. I want my class to be have a sense of community and that what we are learning doesn’t become just something that was learned through a textbook or worksheet, but instead something we are applying throughout the school year. Every year will be different and every year our teaching approach/philosophy might change a bit, but what should never change is the dedication and passion for what you’re doing.
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Reply from Sandy Do posted on March 15th 2013
My philosophy of teaching is getting to know each child and recognizing that each child is different in how they learn and develop. I think that it is important to create an environment where students are interested in learning and do not burdened to ask questions when they are confused. I want students to enjoy and look forward to going to school every day. I would incorporate both group and individual work. Group work will allow students to work and engage with each other. This will help those students who are confused on the topic to understand the concept better through the view of the other students. Group work makes learning more fun for the students and can be relaxing. Individual work will allow students to have their own critical thinking opportunities. I think that it is important to develop lesson plans that are interesting and entertaining, yet simple. This will help to keep the students engaged. I will also be open to changing certain aspects of my teaching style if it is necessary. Overall I believe that it is important for the teacher to build a positive relationship with each student, encourage students to stay motivated even if they make mistakes, remind them that they can accomplish anything that they set their mind to, and help students to realize their full potential and individual worth.
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Reply from Marday Byers posted on March 13th 2013
My teaching philosophy is teaching children the standards through guided lessons, self exploration, group work, and fun activities to review what was taught. There are many aspects to my philosophy. First and foremost is teaching the children the standards because right now, that is the focus and is what the children need to know to succeed in school. I want the children to learn the standards through guidance from myself, then allowing them to try in groups and on their own. Most importantly, I think learning should be fun and engage the students any way possible. I know there are many activities that allow the children to get up and move as well as work on subjects such as math, science, etc. I have obtained this philosophy through experiencing bad teachers, good teachers, being a nanny, and running my own classroom in an after school program. As I take more classes and get closer to teaching, there might be some modifications to this philosophy, but this will always be the skeleton.
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Reply from Paige Sutton posted on March 13th 2013
I agree that it is quite crucial for one whose aim is to work with young children to develop a philosophy because it leads to consistency; which in working with children is highly important. I think it is valuable when developing this philosophy not only to look within oneself in terms of understanding their selves and their own characteristics which will be important as a teacher, but also to look outward, and attempt to envision the characteristics of their future students, because one may believe they have their philosophy completed; yet when they actually get in a teaching setting, with 20 or more students that are developmentally different, and that all have their own personalities and are developing their own sense of self and beliefs, that philosophy may become entirely altered. Given that, I think it is important to have an underlying goal in mind, by that I mean, have a teaching structure in mind, and a curriculum in mind, but also be prepared to make changes as they may come. Develop a wide variety of strategies in teaching your students different things, whether it be Math or English, that way, there is more room for exploration for students who may or may not learn differently. Overall, it is highly important to have a drive to help children succeed in school, and work with them to adopt a positive, firm foundation from which they can learn and will continue to want to learn with age and increasing grade levels.
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Reply from Jacquie White posted on March 12th 2013
Having been in both the private education system and public schools, along with transferring around to many different places, I have come to recognize that teaching can be done in so many ways. I think that my starting philosophy of teaching would be that children's development of knowledge comes from exploration, experiments, and lots of practice. I would try to teach each subject matter in multiple ways so that all the children in the class would have a fair shot at learning. Some people are visual learners, so activities involving pictures might be something I would do. Some people are more memorization type learners, so maybe I would thoroughly go through the subject and repeat the activity in different ways. It's hard to say what my philosophy may evolve into one way, but I think being able to understand all the different approaches to learning would be a good start.
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Reply from Sarah Johnson posted on March 12th 2013
After spending all this time is child development classes and from my experiences in working with young children there a few things that, as a teacher, I feel are going to be the most crucial to incorporate in my lesson plans. I feel like we need to get to know our students as much as possible so we can cater what we teach to what they know and what they need to learn. I also feel like students work best when they are in an environment that is supportive, where they feel like its okay to be wrong and they are comfortable just trying. I also believe in inductive learning and as much hands on projects as possible like posters and presentations. I also like to see portfolios so both the students are I can see their progress.
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Reply from Dawn Powdrill posted on March 12th 2013
As a future teach I find that it is my responsibility to offer the most fulfilling varieties of learning to the classroom. Also, I believe that as a teacher one must provide non biased, non judgmental care for each child leaving personal beliefs, and standards at the door. As a lead teacher I believe it is imperative to bring multiple learning experiences to the children such as: hands on experiences, visual aids, critical thinking opportunities, and modalities that reach all types of learners. My hope is to bring quality education to the whole child.
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Reply from Lysett Perez posted on March 12th 2013
My teaching philosophy probably has many similarities to many teachers or soon to be teacher’s ideals. I have noticed that as I engage myself more and more in this field that certain ideals have changed in many ways. I no longer see teaching the way I used too. Now I see it as setting a foundation for our future. Maybe some students walk on this path knowing this but I did not and I am glad that I have figured this out. I do know one part of my philosophy that has not changed is how I want to perceive students or children in my classroom. I think it is so very important to be a teacher that each child can look up to, remember hopefully encourage them to accomplish whatever it may be they want to do in life. This can be in so many different ways throughout each grade and with every class. I like to think that as I continue my future as teacher that this does not change. I hope I just finder better ways to fulfill these important ideals.
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Reply from Anna Truong posted on March 10th 2013
Having prior experience working with children, I have always been one that values development and knowledge through exploration and things of that nature. I love exposing children to more hands on activities because I feel that it helps them understand better concepts and keeps them engaged. I also think what is effective is learning about each child and what their interests are and developing lesson plans that are enjoyable and mean something to them. I understand that all children are different and with that, I know that my philosophy will slightly differ from child to child in order to fulfill their needs. Overall, I feel that building strong relationships with each and every child will help them develop to their full potential without feeling scared to explore and make mistakes.
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Reply from Noung posted on March 10th 2013
I think that it is important to recognize that each child is different and learn things differently. However, there are still a lot of similarities between children and sometimes it is best for children to learn from their peers than from their teachers. Most importantly, I think it is important for children to understand why they are going to school and why they need to learn the things that they have to learn. However, it shouldn\'t be done in a way that children will have a negative view of things.
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Reply from Paige Sutton posted on March 9th 2013
I agree that it is quite crucial for one whose aim is to work with young children to develop a philosophy because it leads to consistency; which in working with children is highly important. I think it is valuable when developing this philosophy not only to look within oneself in terms of understanding their selves and their own characteristics which will be important as a teacher, but also to look outward, and attempt to envision the characteristics of their future students. One may believe they have their philosophy completed; yet when they actually get in a teaching setting, with 20 or more students that are developmentally different, and that all have their own personalities and are developing their own sense of self and beliefs, that philosophy may become entirely altered. Given that, I think it is important to have an underlying goal in mind, by that I mean, have a teaching structure in mind, and a curriculum in mind, but also be prepared to make changes as they may come. Develop a wide variety of strategies in teaching your students different things, whether it be Math or English, that way, there is more room for exploration for students who may or may not learn differently. Overall, it is highly important to have a drive to help children succeed in school, and work with them to adopt a positive, firm foundation from which they can learn and will continue to WANT to learn with age and increasing grade levels.
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Reply from Kayla Briney posted on March 7th 2013
The teaching profession is both challenging and rewarding. It is one of the hardest jobs but it brings about some of the greatest joys. I have been volunteering in a classroom for over 10 years. I have been able to work one-on-one with student and change their lives as they change mine. My philosophy for teaching is to bring about a positive learning environment where the children strive to achieve their best and build an enthusiasm to learn. I think learning is something that should be interesting and enjoyable, not something that is feared. I want my students some day to want to learn and be excited to be in school. To accomplish this, I would bring about things and ideas that interest children and try to make the lessons as entertaining and educational as possible.
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Reply from Michelle Wilson posted on March 7th 2013
My philosophy of teaching evolved over the years first as a mother, second the classroom experience as a parent who volunteered, as a supplemental instruction leader in my community college and lastly taking in the ways my college professors positive attitudes towards learning. As I consider my beliefs concerning teaching and learning, I find that my purpose as a teacher would be to support positive learning, to generate learner enthusiasm for learning, and to provide a strong foundation for lifelong learning. To accomplish this, I enjoy would apply a wide variety of strategies based on essential educational principles encompassing cognitive functioning, learning theory, diversity issues, instructional planning, and assessment. Depending on the age group, I would plan activities to help with cognitive functioning such as short story writing with instruction to fit the situation. I also know understanding both the learning style of individual learners and the cultural diversity of the class/group helps me both design and shape beneficial instruction by applying appropriate strategies. I would use a curriculum to adjust for individual preferences, engage varied learning styles, and help institute a consideration for differing preferences and viewpoints.
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Reply from Jennifer Gutierrez posted on March 5th 2013
Becoming a teacher requires having a passion and also the incorporation of different philosophies. There should not just be a narrowed philosophy, instead embracing the different variety of philosophies. My teaching philosophies would include certain values but also be opened for alterations if need be. The most important philosophy in my opinion is, believing that each child deserves an education, no matter their circumstances. I believe that there are a lot of different learning styles that each child learns the best. I believe that each child should be respected in the classroom and feel valued in their knowledge. I also strongly believe that children learn through their beliefs values, cultural, and customs (Vygotsky). As a future teacher I feel I am obligated to accommodate the children needs, learning styles, and also their culture, I know this will not be easy but in order to be a an effective teacher there are many concepts that must be approached.
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